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6th Grade Science / Lesson 1 - Measuring Matter

Measuring Matter

What will we be learning today?

  • In this lesson, we are going to learn all about how can you measure matter.

  • How Can You Measure Matter?

    Oil and water, like all other liquids, are kinds of matter. Matter is the "stuff" that makes up the world around you. Matter includes solids, liquids, and gases. Mountains, Oil and water, like all other liquids, are kinds of matter. Matter is the "stuff" that makes up the world around you. Matter includes solids, liquids, and gases. Mountains, footballs, lakes, clouds, and air are all examples of matter.


    The amount of matter in an object is the object's mass. Scientists measure mass in units of grams (g) or kilograms (kg). The more mass an object has, the harder it is to push or pull. A bowling ball has more mass than a volleyball, which has more mass than a table tennis ball.


    The amount of the pull of gravity between an object and Earth is called the object's weight. Objects with more mass also have more weight. This relationship between weight and mass is used in making a balance. A balance measures an object's mass by allowing gravity to pull the object down.


    The amount of space taken up by an object is called its volume. A basketball, for example, has a greater volume than a tennis ball. Scientists often measure volumes of solids in cubic centimeters., or cm?. A cubic centimeter is the volume of a cube that measures 1 centimeter on each side. In a way the volume of an object equals the number of cubes it takes to fill that object.


    You can use a graduated cylinder to find the volume of a liquid. The unit of volume shown on a graduated cylinder is a milliliter (or mL). One mL is one-thousandth of a liter, and it also equals 1 cm?.


    The bottom level of the curved surface of the water matches a mark on the cylinder. This curved surface is called a meniscus.

    You can also use a graduated cylinder to find the volume of a solid. Drop a solid in water. The amount the water goes up equals the volume of the solid. Can you see why?




    When the rock is placed in the water, the water rises and pours out of the spout.

    Here enough water pours out to fill four cubes that are 1 centimeter on a side. This means the rock has a volume of 4 cm3.


    Let's Review What We Learned Today!

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  • Then complete your worksheet!