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Reading and Writing Rocks Yellow / Lesson 7: What is a Sentence?

Sentences
Complete Sentences


  • Complete Sentences:
  • A complete sentence has a subject and a predicate that work together to make a complete thought.
    Example: Bobby smiled until he thought his face would crack.


Fragment Sentences


  • A SENTENCE FRAGMENT fails to be a sentence in the sense that it cannot stand by itself.

  • Fragment Sentences may have most of the makings of a sentence but still be missing an important part of a verb string.
    EXAMPLE: Some of the girls going together to the mall.


Fragment Sentences


  • Fragment Sentences may locate something in time and place, but lack a subject-verb relationship.
    EXAMPLE: Last Saturday after the ballgame at the ice cream shop.


Run-On Sentences


  • A RUN-ON SENTENCE (sometimes called a fused sentence) has at least two parts, either one of which can stand by itself, but the two parts have been connected together with one or two words instead of becoming two sentences.


Run-On Sentences


  • Remember: The length of a sentence really has nothing to do with whether a sentence is a run-on or not; even a very short sentence could be a run-on.
    EXAMPLE: The books are heavy don't carry them.


Run-On Sentences


  • When two clauses are connected by only a comma, they are a run-on sentence that is called a comma-splice.
    EXAMPLE: The books are heavy, don't carry them.


Run-On Sentences happen


  • when an independent clause gives an order or directive based on what was said in the prior independent clause.
    EXAMPLE: The game is going to be very close you have to play your best.


Run-On Sentences happen


  • when two clauses are connected by words such as however, moreover, nevertheless.
    EXAMPLE: Mother packed my lunch today however she forgot to put in my desert.