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7th Grade Language Arts / Lesson 2.1.2: Difficult Nouns

Homophones
Definition - What are Homophones?


  • Homophones are words that :

    1. Sound the same
    2. Are spelled differently
    3. Have different meanings.

  • The parts of the word "homophone" give you clues to its definition.

    1. Click on each part of the word below to see how it gives you a clue to the definition.
    2. Click on the speaker to hear how the word is pronounced.

hom-o-phone    


Prefixes


  • Prefixes are at the beginning of a word and can help create the meaning of a word or change the meaning of a word. A prefix always carry the same meaning, so it can help you figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word.

  • Many prefixes come from Latin or Greek words, but they may have been adopted from other languages into English as well.

hom - comes from the Greek word homos which means same


Roots


  • Roots are the main part of the word which contains the meaning. A root always carry the same meaning so it can help you figure out the meaning of an unfamiliar word.

  • Many roots come from Latin or Greek words, but they may have been adopted from other languages into English as well.

    phone - a root which comes from the Greek word phone which means "voice" or "sound."


  • Therefore, you can see from the prefix and the root that the definition of homophone is something that sounds the same.


Why are Homophones Important?


  • These are words which can cause some trouble for you.


  • Using the incorrect homophone in your written work will change the meaning of your sentence totally!


Examples of Homophones - "ant/aunt"


OR


Examples of Homophones - "flour/flower"


OR


Examples of Homophones - "hair/hare"


OR


Examples of Homophones - "piece/peace"


OR


Examples of Homophones - "pear/pair"


OR


Use of the correct homophone


  • Do you see how much homophones can change the meaning of your sentence?

  • If you want your sentences to be accurate and say exactly what you mean - know your homophones!