<< Back to Lessons Index

7th Grade Language Arts / Lesson 8d2: Diagramming Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences

Diagramming Compound & Complex Sentences

Review


  • A sentence diagram is a type graphic organizer that helps you see how the words in a sentence relate to one another.

    1. A diagram has a horizontal base line on which the subject and verb are placed.
    2. The subject and verb are separated by a vertical line that passes through the base line.
    3. Direct objects are separated from the verb by a vertical line that does not go through the     base line.
    4. Modifiers are placed below the base line.



Compound Sentences


  • Compound sentences are diagrammed on two separate lines, one above the other.




  • The two lines are joined by a dotted line that looks like a step that joins the verbs. The coordinating conjunction or semicolon is written on the "step."



Example - Compound Sentence
Bob plays the piano, and Sarah plays the violin


  • The two lines are joined by a dotted line that looks like a step that joins the verbs. The coordinating conjunction or semicolon is written on the "step."


Complex Sentences - Adjective Clause


  • Complex sentences are also diagrammed on two separate lines




  • However, they are joined by a straight dotted line that joins the subordinate clause and the noun or pronoun it modifies.


Example: Complex Sentence w. Adjective Clause
  • She is the student who won the speech contest.



Complex Sentences - Adverb Clause


  • Complex sentences are also diagrammed on two separate lines.




  • However, they are joined by a straight dotted line that connects the modified verb, adverb or adjective in the independent clause with the verb in the subordinate clause. The subordinating conjunction is written on the dotted line.


Example: Complex Sentence w. Adverb Clause
  • I have known him since he was a boy.